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Exploring Gratitude with Your Child

Exploring Gratitude with Your Child

Exploring the notion of gratitude with your child is a great way to help them learn to appreciate what they have; the good in life, so to speak. As a result, not only should they start to feel happier and more fulfilled, but they might also have a greater sense of respect for those around them, therefore building stronger relationships. So, if you’re wondering where to start, here are some tips for exploring gratitude from a private prep school in Hertfordshire.

Ask Them What They’re Grateful For

At the end of each day, at dinnertime or in the car on the way home from school for example, ask your child to share some of the things they are grateful for. Perhaps one of their friends helped them understand something in maths or stuck up for them against a bully on the playground. Maybe they’re just grateful for clean clothes or a lift home. It doesn’t matter how big or small the things are, just that your child is able to think about them. You should share some of your own examples too, so that your child gets the gist. Eventually, this will start to become more natural to them. 

Encourage Displays of Gratitude 

If your child shares something that they’re grateful for that you think warrants a thank you, why not encourage them to write a card or send some flowers. It’s one thing to feel appreciative or something or someone, but it’s another to actually demonstrate your gratitude through physical acts such as these. For instance, your child could give their teacher a gift at the end of term to express how much they appreciate all their help. They could send thank you cards after their birthday party to express how grateful they are to their friends for attending and bringing gifts. 

Avoid Complaining

Try not to complain about things in front of your child, even if it’s something simple like the traffic or the weather, because they will adopt a similar outlook. It’s better to try and put a positive spin on negative situations so that your child can learn to look for the good in life. For example, if you’ve had to cancel your trip to the zoo due to the rain, rather than complaining, say something like “no to worry, we can have a great day at the cinema instead”. 

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